Five Ways Volunteering Actually Benefits Your Volunteers

When you’re recruiting volunteers for your organization, you’re obviously going to pitch your cause and the impact you make on your community. Volunteering for a nonprofit is an obvious way to help others, and most of the people who volunteer are looking for just that—a way to help.

But there’s more to volunteering than giving back. Have you ever considered that it’s an opportunity for your volunteers to help themselves as well? From honing professional skills to expanding their network, volunteering can be a win-win for both your volunteers and the people you serve.

In your recruitment efforts, it’s not a bad thing to point out how rolling up your sleeves and donating time and energy can make a positive difference in your volunteers’ lives, even beyond doing good. You never know who you may inspire to give back when you mention what’s in it for them.

Here are five things to tell prospects that may encourage more of them to sign up.

  1. “It can fuel your passion.” Even the happiest employees can get stuck in a rut, and people who love their day jobs can get bored. Volunteering for an organization like yours offers people something new to invest in and may reignite a spark for those who are feeling bogged down with their daily routines. Position volunteer opportunities as a way for people get excited again about something they love.
  2. “You can learn new skills.” For people who want to stretch themselves, volunteer opportunities that help them develop new skills are perfect. Professional development isn’t limited to workday hours; you may have volunteer opportunities you can position as “the perfect way to challenge yourself.” Also, remember to mention that your volunteers can (and should) add their volunteer experience to their resume, something that’s particularly important for those who are unemployed.
  3. “It will expand your network.” Not only do volunteers meet others who are like-minded and support the same cause, but they may also find personal and professional connections that could prove advantageous. Getting out and helping your organization could provide a more fulfilling way to network than attending their industry’s next business luncheon. Volunteering is a unique way to meet new people and expand your circle—that’s a great selling point for those who care about growing their network.

For the rest of the tips, check out the full article on Firespring.org>>

  • Samar Misra

    Even with articles like these, what do you suggest regarding unfortunate situations when a long-time volunteer volunteers at an organization for a year with all seeming smooth, but the staff dealing with volunteers unexpectedly terminates the volunteer despite doing nothing wrong and says the volunteer is not a good fit for the role despite not doing anything wrong and encouraged for the volunteer to utilize the organization as a reference? These situations have happened which can get to the heart of the volunteer and affect trust when looking at other places.

    Any feedback would be helpful thanks.