Millennials are coming into their prime. Born between the years of the early 1980s to the early 2000s, we’re basically unavoidable in your daily lives (and I mean that in the most loving, fellow-millennial sense). As with every previous generation, millennials have their fair share of doubters against their work ethic and potential to contribute to society—but we’re rising to the occasion.

If you’re tired of reading between the lines, I’ll skip right to the point: embrace millennials as co-workers. We’re inevitable in the nonprofit workspace.

More than that, we can be valuable assets to your nonprofit board of directors, as we bring a unique perspective to the table. Here’s what we offer:

  1. We could potentially manage upcoming technology. I’m sure that someone within your organization is perfectly capable, but if you’re looking to ditch that burden, technology comes naturally to most millennials. Even better, millennials will be aware of the latest and greatest trends in technology.

  2. We know how to talk to, and engage, fellow millennials. Our generation likes to get behind causes. Whether you’re for volunteer manpower or a boost in your social media numbers, your millennial board members will have good ideas on how to accomplish these goals.

  3. We’re motivated by personal development and yearn for a community. Studies show that millennials are less motivated by money than previous generations. Instead, we seek jobs that we feel will be fulfilling (and bonus: we’re willing to start at a lower salary than most baby boomers). Millennials are also the most educated generation yet!

  4. And finally, every new generation brings a fresh perspective to previous traditional approaches. Millennials care about the success of the organizations and activities we’re involved in.

Does it sound like working with millennials could work for your nonprofit’s board of directors? Then check out the article below to learn what to expect when working with millennials:

What to Expect When the New Nonprofit CEO Is a Millennial [Huffington Post]