In the article below, Krystyn Tully compares content marketing to Twinkie filler.

According to Krystyn, limited time and resources available to most nonprofits shouldn’t be spent on creating filler—content marketing lures readers into a product or service they don’t need and it doesn’t contribute to the improvement of others’ lives (which should be the ultimate goal of nonprofits).

Now, first of all, I agree that some content marketing could be compared to the hydrogenated oil-filled gooey center of a Twinkie. But not all of it.

If done correctly and used properly, content marketing can be a valuable part of your nonprofit marketing plan. Chiefly because it’s a smart strategy to share why your cause is so important, how your nonprofit is making a difference and who your nonprofit is helping—because keep in mind, content marketing encompasses video and photo content, social media and blog posts.

The bottom line is this: content marketing can be crummy. But yours doesn’t have to be. Strive to add genuine value and tell impactful stories through your marketing efforts, and you’ll be doing all volunteers, donors and potentially interested parties a favor by cluing them in on all of the wonderful things your nonprofit does.

Check out Krystyn’s article below, take a look at a few of these articles we’ve featured in the past about content marketing and then let me know what you all think in the comments. So, content marketing—yay or nay?

 

3 (good) reasons for non-profits to ignore so-called content marketing [Krystyn Tully]